Neuromyths in the Light of the Theory of Systemic-Dynamic Brain Organization of Mental Functions

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15826/Lurian.2020.2.2.2

Abstract

Knowledge about brain functioning is important for many professionals, especially in the fields of medicine and education, but for a wide audience as well. Neuromyths are false (completely or partially) simple and seemingly logical statements about the anatomy or functioning of the human brain. This paper presents typical sources of such errors such as misinterpretation, oversimplification, or overgeneralization. Special attention is given to analysis of some examples of the long-established source of misconceptions—regarding functional asymmetry of brain hemispheres, to the myth of the triune brain, and the so called “Mozart effect” from the point of view of the Lurian systemic-dynamic approach to brain functions.

Author Biographies

Olga Semenova, David Yellin Academic College of Education, Jerusalem, Israel

Olga Semenova, PhD, David Yellin Academic College of Education.
POB 3578, Beit HaKerem, 91035, Jerusalem, Israel.

Bella Kotik-Friedgut, David Yellin Academic College of Education, Jerusalem, Israel

Bella Kotik-Friedgut, Doctor in Psychology, David Yellin Academic College of Education.
POB 3578, Beit HaKerem, 91035, Jerusalem, Israel.

Published

2021-07-06

Issue

Section

Research Papers